What’s The Points – Abu Dhabi Update

Previous entries:

    What’s The Points
    What’s The Points – China Update
    What’s The Points – Spain Update
    What’s The Points – Monaco Update
    What’s The Points – Turkey Update
    What’s The Points – Canada Update
    What’s The Points – Valencia Update
    What’s The Points – Great Britain Update
    What’s The Points – Germany Update
    What’s The Points – Hungary Update
    What’s The Points – Belgium Update
    What’s The Points – Italy Update
    What’s The Points – Singapore Update
    What’s The Points – Japan Update
    What’s The Points – Korea Update
    What’s The Points – Brazil Update

Below is a comparison of the World Championship positions for this year’s points (left), last year’s points-system (middle) and the older 10-6-4-3-2-1 approach (right). Ties are decided by count-back.

1   Vettel   256   Vettel   104   Vettel   84
2   Alonso   252   Alonso   101   Alonso   81
3   Webber   242   Hamilton   100   Webber   76
4      Hamilton   240      Webber   97      Hamilton   74
5   Button   214   Button   87   Button   61
6   Massa   144   Massa   57   Massa   36
7   Rosberg   142   Rosberg   55   Rosberg   28
8   Kubica   136   Kubica   52   Kubica   26
9   Schumacher   72   Schumacher   25   Schumacher   11
10   Barrichello   47   Barrichello   15   Barrichello   6

As the concept of this points comparison is to highlight the differences thrown up, the previous two races have been a bit depressing with both finishing with top-ten orders unaffected by the points regime employed. It was always unlikely the different systems would differ in which driver would have become ‘Champion, but at least a little variation appears at the last gasp with Hamilton third over Webber under last year’s points as opposed to Mark having the advantage of Lewis by this year’s points and by 10-6-4-3-2-1. Hamilton on the fifteen occasions he scored this season always did so within the top-six, but falls behind the Australian driver by this season’s points because Webber took three eighths and a ninth which are proportionally given greater reward than before, and under 10-6-4-3-2-1, Mark gains the advantage because he took more wins and podiums than Hamilton with more reward for outright results.

This is the order purely on count-back.

    Wins Seconds Thirds Podiums
1   Vettel   5 2 3 10
2   Alonso   5 2 3 10
3   Webber   4 4 2 10
4   Hamilton   3 5 1 9
5   Button   2 3 2 7
6   Massa   2 3 5
7   Kubica   1 2 3
8   Rosberg   3 3

Vettel had more fourth-places than Alonso so would have won also under this scheme (and the medal system proposed by Uncle Bernie with the title won by most wins with points to separate any ties). As before, Rosberg’s consistency did one place better over Kubica under points than count-back.

Alonso (as I did) premised that the title would go to the driver with the most podiums, but failed to make top-three in Abu Dhabi to give himself the eleventh podium that would have won the title. In retrospect, it was decided by which driver had the most top-fours, with Alonso losing by four points and a fourth-place worth twelve points (or six points more than he got in the race for seventh).

These are the points if given to engines:

   Engine Score    Average
per Team
1   Mercedes    736      245·3   
2   Renault   661   330·5   
3   Ferrari   453   151·7   
4   Cosworth   69   17·3   

Renault scored 47 with the new World Champion’s race-win supplemented by points-finishes for Kubica, Petrov, and Webber. Mercedes had second, third, fourth with the two McLarens and Rosberg, scoring 45. Ferrari’s best finish was Alonso’s seventh-place with Alguersuari and Massa taking the last two points-places, giving only nine points. Cosworth did not score.

The scores by nationality of drivers are:

   Nation Points   Scoring
Drivers
1   Germany   545     6
2   Britain   454     2
3   Spain   263     3
4   Australia   242     1
5   Brazil   191     2
6   Poland   136     1
7   Japan   32     1
8   Russia   27     1
9   Italy   21     1
10   Switzerland   8     1

Germany already had this one in the proverbial bag, 37 points for the win and Rosberg’s fourth-place just rubbing it in. Britain defended with the remaining podium places for 33. Kubica’s fifth added ten for Poland. Petrov’s eight points for sixth saw Russia gain a place to eighth overall. Both current Spanish drivers, Alonso and Alguersuari, scored, totaling eight points. Webber took four points for Australia, and Massa one point for Brazil.

This is the Nations’ Cup only counting the score of the highest driver in a race for each country. I have also decided to use 10-6-4-3-2-1, partly because I think it a better scoring regime, partly because it meant less work. Thus, for example, the McLaren 1-2 in China would give Britain 10 points for the win, nothing for second, and Rosberg’s third place would give Germany 4 points, with nothing for Vettel’s sixth place.

   Nation Points  
1   Britain   103    
2   Germany   100    
3   Spain   81    
4   Australia   76    
5   Brazil   42    
6   Poland   26    
7   Russia   3    
8   Japan   1    
9   Italy   1    

With Vettel’s late season surge and McLaren’s slump, Britain’s lead was diminishing but Lewis’s second-place in Abu Dhabi was enough to win this despite Vettel’s race-victory. The next scoring driver was Kubica for fifth (Poland) followed by Russian driver Petrov.

This next table shows the standings based on qualification using current points.

1   Vettel   384
2   Webber   336
3   Alonso   232
4   Hamilton   222
5   Button   146
6   Massa   142
7   Kubica   122
8   Rosberg   121
9   Barrichello   58
10   Schumacher   56
11   Hülkenberg   49
12   Sutil   21
13   Petrov   11
14   Liuzzi   10
15   Kobayashi   5
16   de la Rosa   4

Vettel took his tenth pole of the season. Robert Kubica failed to make Q3 for the only time this season, so only the two Red Bull drivers were top-ten (indeed top-six) for every race. Button qualified fourth, two places ahead of Massa, to take fifth-place off the Brazilian. Barrichello before Abu Dhabi was tied with Schumacher, behind on count-back, but Rubens qualified seventh, two places ahead of his ex-Ferrari team-mate, to grab ninth overall. Petrov qualified tenth, edging his team-mate out of Q3 and taking 13th-place off Liuzzi..

The drivers not to have made Q3 at any point this season include the new-team drivers, Jaime Alguersuari, Sebastien Buemi, and Nick Heidfeld.

These are the fastest-lap points with the number of outright fastest laps in brackets.

1   Webber   267   (3)
2   Alonso   248   (5)
3   Vettel   236   (3)
4   Hamilton   231   (5)
5   Button   157   (1)
6   Kubica   138   (1)
7   Massa   122  
8   Rosberg   120  
9   Schumacher   72  
10   Petrov   63   (1)
11   Barrichello   54  
12   Sutil   46  
13   Buemi   43  
14   Alguersuari   39  
15   Liuzzi   26  
16   Kobayashi   25  
17   Hülkenberg   21  
18   de la Rosa   9  
19   Heidfeld   2  

The top-five in this discipline in Brazil were Hamilton, Button, Rosberg, Vettel, and Kubica. No changes in overall position.

This is the Super-Championship position, adding up the scores for the World Championship, qualification, and fastest-laps. In brackets are the total number of wins, poles, and outright fastest-laps.

1   Vettel   876   (18)
2   Webber   845   (12)
3   Alonso   732   (12)
4   Hamilton   693   (9)
5   Button   517   (3)
6   Massa   408  
7   Kubica   396   (1)
8   Rosberg   383  
9   Schumacher   200  
10   Barrichello   159  
11   Sutil   114  
12   Petrov   101   (1)
13   Hülkenberg   92   (1)
14   Kobayashi   62  
15   Liuzzi   57  
16   Buemi   51  
17   Alguersuari   44  
18   de la Rosa   19  
19   Heidfeld   8  

Click here to see my Google documents laps-and-distance-completed spreadsheet.

See also RG’s final update for his championship for new teams.

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