What’s The Points – Korea Update

Previous entries:

    What’s The Points
    What’s The Points – China Update
    What’s The Points – Spain Update
    What’s The Points – Monaco Update
    What’s The Points – Turkey Update
    What’s The Points – Canada Update
    What’s The Points – Valencia Update
    What’s The Points – Great Britain Update
    What’s The Points – Germany Update
    What’s The Points – Hungary Update
    What’s The Points – Belgium Update
    What’s The Points – Italy Update
    What’s The Points – Singapore Update
    What’s The Points – Japan Update

Below is a comparison of the World Championship positions for this year’s points (left), last year’s points-system (middle) and the older 10-6-4-3-2-1 approach (right). Ties are decided by count-back.

1   Alonso   231   Alonso   93   Alonso   77
2   Webber   220   Webber   88   Webber   70
3   Hamilton   210   Hamilton   87   Hamilton   65
4      Vettel   206      Vettel   84      Vettel   64
5   Button   189   Button   77   Button   55
6   Massa   143   Massa   57   Massa   36
7   Kubica   124   Kubica   48   Kubica   24
8   Rosberg   122   Rosberg   47   Rosberg   24
9   Schumacher   66   Schumacher   23   Schumacher   11
10   Barrichello   47   Barrichello   15   Barrichello   6

A horrific race for RBR, with their first double-no-score of the season. With an eleven point lead, things look good for Alonso. If the Korea result were to be repeated in Brazil, Fernando would be World Champion. If Webber can win the remaining two races, that would put him on 270 which Alonso could not beat even if he finished second in both. As well as Alonso moving above Webber and Hamilton moving above Vettel, Kubica takes a place off non-finishing Rosberg in all three systems.

With all the top contenders having had such up-and-down seasons, it is not so surprising the top places are the same in all three systems, it was always unlikely that which of these points-regimes used would change the eventual ‘Champion, but for all three top-tens to be identical in order is unexpected. By this year’s points, Fernando’s lead over Webber is 44% of a race-win, last year’s points, 50% of a race-win, and 10-6-4-3-2-1, 70% of a race-win. Under the latter system, Button would be mathematically out of the chase.

Nineteen drivers have scored points in this year’s ‘Championship (all the drivers except those for the new-teams) , eighteen under 10-8-6-5-4-3-2-1 (Alguersuari is yet to finish top-eight). Liuzzi’s sixth-place brings up to fifteen those that have finished top-six this season.

This is the order purely on count-back.

    Wins Seconds Thirds Podiums
1   Alonso   5 2 2 9
2   Webber   4 3 2 9
3   Hamilton   3 4 1 8
4   Vettel   3 2 3 8
5   Button   2 3 1 6
6   Massa   2 3 5
7   Kubica   1 2 3
8   Rosberg   3 3

Pure count-back gives exactly the same top-eight order as the points, with the number of podiums still looking like the biggest title-factor.

The next table shows the points scored by the World Championship contenders over the last five events.

   Driver Score    Average
1   Alonso    90      18·8   
2   Webber   59   11·8   
3   Vettel   55   11·4   
4   Hamilton   53   10·6   

If these mean averages of recent performances are multiplied by the three remaining races, added to the points the drivers currently have, and rounded to the nearest point, it gives this projection of the final tally.

1   Alonso   267
2   Webber   244
3   Hamilton   231
4   Vettel   228

With only two races left, the value of this indicator is very limited. The title will probably go to the highest placed driver that puts in two strong finishes in the last two rounds.

Alonso has won three of the last five races, plus a third and a DNF at Belgium. It seems very much his title to lose. Hamilton has always looked off his best in Brazil, and the long flat-out stretch will not suit Red Bull, so it should be another good weekend for the Spaniard.

These are the points if given to engines:

   Engine Score    Average
per Team
1   Mercedes    655      218·3   
2   Renault   569   284·5   
3   Ferrari   428   142·7   
4   Cosworth   65   16·3   

Ferrari took a 1-3 with both Saubers in the points to take 46 points. Mercedes had Hamilton, Schumacher, and Liuzzi in second, fourth, and sixth, for 38 points. Renault only got ten for Kubica’s fifth-place. Cosworth had both Williams in the points for 7.

The scores by nationality of drivers are:

   Nation Points   Scoring
Drivers
1   Germany   465     6
2   Britain   399     2
3   Spain   240     3
4   Australia   220     1
5   Brazil   190     2
6   Poland   124     1
7   Japan   31     1
8   Italy   21     1
9   Russia   19     1
10   Switzerland   8     1

The win for Spain was enough to win the week and take third off Australia. Webber has to defend his country unaided, but Alonso can not expect much help off Alguersuari, or any more from de la Rosa. Massa and Barrichello gave Brazil 21. Hamilton gave GB 18. Sans Vettel, the German hoards still took 4th, 9th, and 10th for 15. Poland got 10. Liuzzi’s sixth-place gave eight to over-take Russia for eighth. Kobayashi added four for the Land of the Rising Sun.

This is the Nations’ Cup only counting the score of the highest driver in a race for each country. I have also decided to use 10-6-4-3-2-1, partly because I think it a better scoring regime, partly because it meant less work. Thus, for example, the McLaren 1-2 in China would give Britain 10 points for the win, nothing for second, and Rosberg’s third place would give Germany 4 points, with nothing for Vettel’s sixth place.

   Nation Points  
1   Britain   94    
2   Germany   80    
3   Spain   77    
4   Australia   70    
5   Brazil   42    
6   Poland   24    
7   Russia   2    
8   Japan   1    
9   Italy   1    

Alonso’s win with Webber’s DNF sees Spain move up to third. It was with Monaco the second race this season to have the top-six feature six different nations. Liuzzi gave Italy its first point, remaining behind Japan on count-back.

This next table shows the standings based on qualification using current points.

1   Vettel   341
2   Webber   311
3   Alonso   207
4   Hamilton   192
5   Button   134
6   Massa   132
7   Rosberg   119
8   Kubica   116
9   Schumacher   48
10   Barrichello   44
11   Hülkenberg   24
12   Sutil   21
13   Liuzzi   10
14   Petrov   9
15   Kobayashi   5
16   de la Rosa   4

Little change in the status quo. Rosberg’s strong fifth did enable him to climb one position pushing Kubica down a place, the Pole disappointed to only qualify eighth after his car had developed a handling issue since FP3.

These are the fastest-lap points with the number of outright fastest laps in brackets.

1   Webber   247   (3)
2   Alonso   224   (5)
3   Vettel   216   (3)
4   Hamilton   181   (3)
5   Kubica   128   (1)
6   Button   124   (1)
7   Massa   122  
8   Rosberg   95  
9   Schumacher   72  
10   Petrov   59   (1)
11   Barrichello   54  
12   Sutil   44  
13   Buemi   42  
14   Alguersuari   39  
15   Liuzzi   26  
16   Kobayashi   19  
17   Hülkenberg   15  
18   de la Rosa   9  
19   Heidfeld   1  

The top-five in this discipline in Korea were Alonso, Vettel, Hamilton, Massa, Liuzzi. Kubica came seventh, Button outside the top-ten, promoting the Pole to fifth. Liuzzi’s good showing took him past Kobayashi to 15th.

Click here to see my Google documents laps-and-distance-completed spreadsheet.

See also RG’s Korea update for his championship for new teams.

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2 Responses to “What’s The Points – Korea Update”

  1. Dennis Boore Says:

    My distant relative, Billy DeVore (brother of my grandfather) was the driver in the Pat Clancy Special, shown in your pic. from around 1948-49.

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